!!> Download ➾ Chaka ➹ Author Thomas Mofolo – 1sm.info

Chaka Tells The Classic Story Of The Zulu Hero Chaka A tragic tale of the rise and fall of one of the greatest military minds in Africa Shaka Despite the book containing minor typos, it was an enjoyable read I love how the author first introduces us to our protagonist and the circumstances surrounding his upbringing which draws us in into Shaka s world his rise, attainment of power, amassing great wealth and his ultimate downfall Some great scenes in the book with some loopholes as can be expected of such an account but overall a good read. I shall simply kill whomever I wish to kill, whether he is guilty or not, because that is the law of this world I will never have mercy on a person simply because of his pleadings Indeed Chaka returns with no human feeling left in him, his sole aim being to kill, resolved that he will settle every dispute and every quarrel with his stick by killing both the accuser and the accused This is a fictionalised biography of King Shaka spelled Chaka in book It was first written in1909 in SesI shall simply kill whomever I wish to kill, whether he is guilty or not, because that is the law of this world I will never have mercy on a person simply because of his pleadings Indeed Chaka returns with no human feeling left in him, his sole aim being to kill, resolved that he will settle every dispute and every quarrel with his stick by killing both the accuser and the accused This is a fictionalised biography of King Shaka spelled Chaka in book It was first written in1909 in Sesotho The first English translation was in 1931 and the version I am reviewing is a 1981 English translation.The book tells the story of Chaka, from birth to death and all the hell he raised in the southern Africa during his time It sounds like the story is set before the White Settlement in South Africa, though this might not be historically accurate, I guess historical accuracy in a fictional tale is a moot point The reason I am inclined to believe this timing is because Chaka prophesized, with his dying breath, the coming of the white menYou are killing me in the hope that you will be kings when I am dead, whereas you are wrong, that is not the way it will be because umlungu, the white man, is coming, and it is he who will rule you, and you will be his servants This book readslike a historical paranormal fiction with the writing style of the bible The reason for this analogy is because it was difficult at times to understand what the text was trying to say, and I realised that this is because it s a translation Somethings that would have made perfect sense in the original language sounded ridiculous in English, especially where the translator tried to keep word for word of the original phrase And trying to explain some actual customs without changing or adding on to the explanation, just made the explanationconfusing There was also the issue of somethings, places, events and even customs referred to in the story and the author assumed general knowledge of the reader, and this assumed knowledge actually being important to what was being narrated Which means, if as the reader, one doesn t have that knowledge then that part of the story is lost Again, this might be because the original book was written for a localised audience, and the translator also did not take broader audience into consideration and decided to stick to the word for word translation This book is a classic and I was surprised that though it came from a country that not many know about, at the time the writers race was not expected to achieve much in the ways of the Western, the story can hold its own against the nowadays paranormal and fantasy novels I am not sure if a translator of a book is allowed to addexplanation or even translate in the way that gives the intended meaning rather than literal translation, because this would help the reader getfrom the book On the other hand, that might be like reading Shakespeare written in today s language, which I have read and actually didn t like because while easily understandable, the richness of the language is lost Our MC, Chaka, was an outcast from birth His father was a king with several wives but none of his wives could bear him any sons The king propositioned a young lady, Nandi, to lay with him, out of wedlock, even though he knew that the law was that the penalty for out of marriage sex was death for the guilty parties and all their age mates fiction This was because everyone in that age group would be considered rotten and would have to be purged So, when they discovered that they were pregnant they got married before Nandi started showing The problem was that Chaka was born earlier than 9 months after marriage but because he was the only son to the king, this did not become an issue Soon after his birth, some of the first wives also had sons, three, and succession became an issue The wives demanded that the king should uphold the law and kill Nandi and his son Because the king loved his youngest wife and his son, he opted for banishing them to Nandi s home village to never come back.Because of his origin, Chaka was abused and ridiculed by everyone, his peers and adults alike, except for his mother He grew up angry, ambitious and bitter and all he wanted was to be a king after his father And not just a king, the greatest king his world had ever seen Through the help of a witch doctor and its disciples, he achieved this, but in the process, he lost his humanity Because of his upbringing and through guidance of his witch doctor he became the cruellest ruler and the most insatiable killerI believe that you have, in a small way, seen the affairs of this world, that people live by favouritism and bias, by hatred and by strength and now you too must part with mercy from this very day, because mercy devours its owner For him to maintain his success and achieve the greatness that he wanted, the only requirement from his doctor was that his spear must never be without bloodOne important matter which I want you to understand well is that the great king who once visited you at the river is a person who loves war if you do not spill blood, he will not be pleased with you Also, the medicine with which I have vaccinated you is a medicine of blood if you do not spill much blood, it will turn against you and kill you instead Your sole purpose should be to kill without mercy, and thus clear the path that leads to the glory of your kingship It is extremely evil, but it is also extremely good Choose And so Chaka choose greatness over mercy and the demanded price for this was for him to sacrifice his greatest love, his wife and he never married after that The book details some of the atrocities that he committed in his quest for greatness and the results of such on most of the southern Africa Chaka conquered many tribes and his practice was that, from the conquered tribes, only young men not yet set in their ways and women of childbearing age should be kept, everyone else was killed This led to difaqane crushing, scattering, forced dispersal, forced migrationIt was through Chaka that the difaqane came into existence, the time when people ate each other, and stole or took by force what belonged to others it was also the time of the homeless wanderer, something that had not been known before It was through him that cannibalism first came into being, this thing which is uglier anddespicable than all others, when people hunted each other like animals for the sole purpose of eating each otherDifaqane and what this passage is referring to is a historical fact The death toll is estimated between 1 and 2 million.His killings did not only extend to the conquered but to his people also and because of this, where he started as a beloved king, soon his commanders were plotting against him His loyalties were only to himself and his ambitions He hated to see his commanders rise in ranks and would devise ways for them to get killed or come up with some of the craziest reasons to kill themHe returns determined to fight a war that has no end, by means of which he will kill both his enemies and his own people and friends in a clandestine manner The frightening vengeance of his heart is indeed about to drive him mad This is what led to his downfall and eventual death.I really enjoyed this book, scary and unfortunate as may be that a character of this kind once walked the earth Good or bad, he was one of the great sons of Africa and his nation still exist to this day an underappreciated epic.really enjoyed this book, farthan I expected Written like a greek tragedy, it plays on the mythology and wonder of Africa, and digs deep into a culture struggling through tribal war and tyrannical order I loved the idea of the witchdoctor playing a major role in Chaka s ascension as well the character development of chaka himself I perhaps wish some other side characters like nandi or noliwe could have had someattention, however the main focus is Chaka and an underappreciated epic.really enjoyed this book, farthan I expected Written like a greek tragedy, it plays on the mythology and wonder of Africa, and digs deep into a culture struggling through tribal war and tyrannical order I loved the idea of the witchdoctor playing a major role in Chaka s ascension as well the character development of chaka himself I perhaps wish some other side characters like nandi or noliwe could have had someattention, however the main focus is Chaka and I understand this Learning about his leadership and fall from grace gave a sense of poetic justice as well as human sorrow especially considering Chaka early torment It gives two sides to one life and made this book all thetragic An epic, mythical tale of Chaka s rise and life as a king in the early 19th century Even if straightforward in style, Mofolo s novel can be a little hard to pinpoint It starts off partly educational, partly a psychological portrait, as the author introduces us to the historical context and to the character of Chaka in his youth Then, he moves on to explaining that only exceptional causes could lead a man to such a destiny, moving to a moral meditation on greatness and on what has to be trad An epic, mythical tale of Chaka s rise and life as a king in the early 19th century Even if straightforward in style, Mofolo s novel can be a little hard to pinpoint It starts off partly educational, partly a psychological portrait, as the author introduces us to the historical context and to the character of Chaka in his youth Then, he moves on to explaining that only exceptional causes could lead a man to such a destiny, moving to a moral meditation on greatness and on what has to be traded for it The last part ends on a nightmarish and bloody portrayal of Chaka s late rule.Mofolo largely follows what we know of the historical figure, but he exaggerates here and there for dramatic effect I think the best finding of the book, which makes it entertaining, is the trio Isanusi Ndlebe Malunga, the three doctors who appear midway and who account for the supernatural character of Chaka s destiny his talent to impress, lead and rule stroke as lightning in a feudal society made of villages and small trade If anythingthan about Chaka, at a deeper level the book is about war and change To Mofolo, Chaka s exclusive fascination for power is closely linked to his readiness to break up the traditional social organization of the Bantu, to the use of subjugation and the birth of a personality cult, and to a society entirely dedicated to war andvirility for one I suspect Mofolo to have a Christian reading Chaka s warmongering and hunger for fame is a road of increasing murders and folly Which I can get behind, I suppose the shocking string of massacres in the book can t be far off from reality.Overall a strong epic, if brutal and a little linear, that does not render Shaka any less mysterious Easy to read too Less political than the excellent 80s mini series that focus on his access to the rule after Senzangakhona, but an interesting reading by a Sotho writer at the time when Umlungu had arrived Had no understanding of why Chaka was such a great figure in African history By the end of the atory, regardless if some information was fact or fiction, I couldn t stand to read about Chaka and the atrocities he had committed. This is a true horror novel The story of a mass murderer, a blood thirsty King satiated, only, by endless killing.Mofolo writes with a near Roman Histories sort of pithiness Yet describes the violence and gore with a modern flair The novelization of Chaka s life adds magical interventions into the purpose and cruelty of the Zulu nation building Mofolo, possibly in order to justify his focus on the merciless slaughter, invents a demonic witch doctor who blesses Chaka s life with medicines and This is a true horror novel The story of a mass murderer, a blood thirsty King satiated, only, by endless killing.Mofolo writes with a near Roman Histories sort of pithiness Yet describes the violence and gore with a modern flair The novelization of Chaka s life adds magical interventions into the purpose and cruelty of the Zulu nation building Mofolo, possibly in order to justify his focus on the merciless slaughter, invents a demonic witch doctor who blesses Chaka s life with medicines and blessings Mofolo s Chaka is a dispassionate psychopath who can only be comforted by murder, death, and the spilling of blood All in his eternal quest to be the one true King His only two goals in life were to kill and rule And mass murder is the order of the last 80 pages Once Chaka comes to power, he murders everyone If they sing too well, if they sing off key, if they don t sing at all Chaka has his people killed.War is eternal This is a novel of quite extraordinary interest Of course, the historical material is subordinated to the novelist s art when we read of the giant serpent emerging from the river and winding itself around Chaka whilst caressing him with its flickering forked tongues, we know we are in the mythic realm And what a realm it is This novel is successful on many different levels As a study of the corrosive effects of absolute power and the corrupting consequences of deliberately making dark choice This is a novel of quite extraordinary interest Of course, the historical material is subordinated to the novelist s art when we read of the giant serpent emerging from the river and winding itself around Chaka whilst caressing him with its flickering forked tongues, we know we are in the mythic realm And what a realm it is This novel is successful on many different levels As a study of the corrosive effects of absolute power and the corrupting consequences of deliberately making dark choices to gain power, it is masterful At the same time it conveys a very clear sense of time and place And what a time and what a place I don t mean to sound facetious, but how could anyone resist ostrich feather plumes and leopardskin accessories Wonderful and unjustly underrated, as indeed Mr Mofolo was in his own lifetime Chaka was one of the first of Africa s significant contribution to classic world literature This novel gives a highly fictionalised account of the great Shaka, from the circumstances surrounding his death, to his rise to never before seen power and culminating in the prophetic claim of the coming of the white man in his death.Chaka is a classic tragedy there s the flawed character, Chaka supernatural occurrences in the form of the sorcerer, Isanusi and the tragic end of this bloodthirsty an Chaka was one of the first of Africa s significant contribution to classic world literature This novel gives a highly fictionalised account of the great Shaka, from the circumstances surrounding his death, to his rise to never before seen power and culminating in the prophetic claim of the coming of the white man in his death.Chaka is a classic tragedy there s the flawed character, Chaka supernatural occurrences in the form of the sorcerer, Isanusi and the tragic end of this bloodthirsty anti hero according to the novel.What this novel, which the translator, Daniel Kunene, tries to highlight the African form of storytelling with, does is to spark an interest in the real historical figure of Chaka In writing this novel, Thomas Mofolo has given as an enduring example of the African tragedy, written in his traditional language of Sesotho, about an empire that existed before colonialism and Christianity Fascinating but pretty dull Really picks up in the final third of the book The first two thirds were a slog


About the Author: Thomas Mofolo

Thomas Mokopu Mofolo 22 December 1876 8 September 1948 is considered to be the greatest Basotho author He wrote mostly in the Sesotho language, but his most popular book, Chaka, has been translated into English and other languages.


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